subscribe: Posts | Comments

leader

Troubleshooting High-Rise Water Supply

comments

If the control wheel is broken, firefighters can easily remove it with a screwdriver or a pair of large channel-lock-type pliers. Photos Mike Kirby

If the control wheel is broken, firefighters can easily remove it with a screwdriver or a pair of large channel-lock-type pliers. Photos Mike Kirby

What can you do if one or two fire lines operating from a standpipe riser aren’t delivering enough gpm to control or extinguish the fire, OR you can’t advance into the fire floor due to the large volume of fire? Options include:

  1. Ensure you’re using high-flow 2½” fire lines.
  2. Provide additional gpm to the fire floor (or floors below) by stretching a temporary standpipe with a 5″ supply line to the upper floors to supply portable master streams or additional fire lines.
  3. Place portable master-stream devices onto the fire floor, either from the standpipe riser or a temporary standpipe using a 5″ line via the stairs.
  4. If there are adjacent buildings of the same or greater height within reach of your streams, place streams on the fire from the adjacent buildings. You can operate off the standpipe risers and also stretch a temporary standpipe with a 5″ supply line to provide maximum flow from a master-stream device.
  5. Attack the fire from a window on the floor below to a window on the fire floor. A commercial nozzle is available from Elkhart Brass that will accomplish this task.
  6. Pump additional lines from the lower-level discharges to provide additional water, if needed. Note: This will only work if there are no pressure relief valves/devices present.
  7. As a last resort, create an improvised “sprinkler system” by flooding the floor immediately above the fire, thus trying to contain the fire to the floor of origin.

Comments

comments